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Lakeland Times, Minocqua, Wisconsin
Jacob Friede/Lakeland Times

DNR biologist Zach Woiak, front, and DNR fisheries supervisor John Kubisiak demonstrate to students of the Wildlife Ecology Summer Field Course at Kemp Station how to pull in a fyke net.
Jacob Friede/Lakeland Times DNR biologist Zach Woiak, front, and DNR fisheries supervisor John Kubisiak demonstrate to students of the Wildlife Ecology Summer Field Course at Kemp Station how to pull in a fyke net.
Friday, May 24, 2019 7:29 AM
No one is having a more wild time at camp this summer than the University of Wisconsin-Madison students currently staying at Kemp Station south of Woodruff. They are taking a two week Wildlife Ecology Summer Field Course at the research center on the shores of Lake Tomahawk where they will eat, sleep, and breathe on the wild side. That’s because the campus is carved out of a quiet piece of quintessential Northwoods. (subscriber access)
  • DNR evaluates crossbow use in Wisconsin
    At the request of the Natural Resources Board (NRB) in March, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) began a comprehensive evaluation of crossbow use in Wisconsin. (subscriber access)
  • The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Wildlife Services verified that wolves harassed two pet dogs in the town of Minocqua in Oneida County. (subscriber access)
  • FeU presents ‘Winter Birds of the Northwoods’ class beginning Nov. 12
    The Northwoods region is known for its harsh winters, with heavy snow, freezing temperatures and lack of sunlight. However, despite these conditions a number of bird species call this frozen landscape home.
  • At 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at the Minocqua Brewing Company, Science on Tap features David MacFarland for a conversation/discussion of wildlife research in the Northwoods. 
  • Freedom
    A local eagle, a.k.a. Uncle Sam, is released to the wild by Northwoods Wildlife Center (NWC) intern Frances Torres. While at the NWC, Uncle Sam made a full recovery from severe burns and a broken wing bone. See Natural Reaction for the story.
  • Natural Reaction: Belated Independence Day for
local eagle
    A couple months ago I visited the Northwoods Wildlife Center (NWC), a wildlife rehabilitation facility in Minocqua, to visit an eagle that had been grounded due to injuries. (subscriber access)
  • Former Department of Natural Resources wildlife biologist Bruce Bacon will be the next guest of the Boulder Junction Public Library’s Neighbor to Neighbor Program Series at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Boulder Junction Community Center, 5392 Park St. Bacon will give a presentation on “Osprey Research in Wisconsin.”
  • Northwoods Wildlife Center Fall Open House on Oct. 19
    The Northwoods Wildlife Center will host the 7th annual Fall Open House from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, at 8683 S Blumenstein Road, Minocqua. 
  • As Wisconsin’s hunters are taking to the water during the 2019 waterfowl hunting season, many will be utilizing Oneida County’s lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands that offer exceptional and diverse habitats for hunting. However, hunters should be aware that invasive plants and animals, large and small, are a looming threat to our fragile natural resources. 
  • Northwoods Wildlife Center Fall Open House on Oct. 19
    The Northwoods Wildlife Center will host the 7th annual Fall Open House from 1 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 19, at 8683 S Blumenstein Road, Minocqua. 
  • Natural Reaction: What's with all the moose?
    Over the last couple weeks I have been getting a number of moose pictures and reports of moose sightings. They have come in from the Minocqua area, Lac du Flambeau area, Manitowish Waters area, and Mercer area, and while moose sighting are usually a rare occurrence in northern Wisconsin, that is not always the case come mid- to late-September. (subscriber access)
  • Northwoods Wildlife Center: 40 years of courage
and compassion
    In the 40 years since its founding, Northwoods Wildlife Center (NWC) has rehabilitated thousands of animals, and while they’re always on-hand to mend a wing or stitch a wound, they’ve also discovered that sometimes the best way to help wildlife is to educate the most threatening animal of all: Humans. (subscriber access)
  • If there’s one thing I’ve noticed about the duck season, as it progresses and the temperatures get colder and colder, the amount of boats at the launch in the morning diminish greatly. (subscriber access)
  • I’ve written before about plankton (specifically zooplankton), the tiny critters that float and swim around in our lakes, providing a main source of food for the developing stages of fish. (subscriber access)
  • Patients making progress at Northwoods Wildlife Center
    The Northwoods Wildlife Center (NWC), a wildlife rehabilitation center in Minocqua, is currently caring for a porcupine who had very rough summer. (subscriber access)
  • Northwoods Almanac
    Fawns

    The last week in May marks the time when fawns are typically born in northern Wisconsin. Keep in mind that fawns produce little scent to attract predators and their instinct for their first two weeks of life is to be as invisible as possible by lying still. (Subscriber Access)
  • About 1,500 deer were sampled and tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Lincoln, Langlade, Oneida, Forest and Vilas counties during the 2018 CWD surveillance year (April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019). The Department of Natural Resources encouraged hunters to submit tissue samples from harvested adult deer in two surveillance areas near Rhinelander.
  • UW-Madison students get northern exposure at Kemp Station
    No one is having a more wild time at camp this summer than the University of Wisconsin-Madison students currently staying at Kemp Station south of Woodruff. They are taking a two week Wildlife Ecology Summer Field Course at the research center on the shores of Lake Tomahawk where they will eat, sleep, and breathe on the wild side. That’s because the campus is carved out of a quiet piece of quintessential Northwoods. (subscriber access)
  • Natural reaction
    Unlike the slow grandeur of the sunsets they scatter through, bats are a fleeting beauty. They’re the first glimpse of night as they dart across the dusk and disappear into nocturnal mystery.  Their dazzling flight, quick as the fading light, allows no time for close observation. Bats are a challenging treat to the eye which unfortunately is becoming more and more rare. (subscriber access)
  • Four more wolf incidents reported in the Northwoods
    With bear hunters in the woods currently, wolf/dog incidents have been reported across the Northwoods. (subscriber access)
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